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Article

Methylene Blue and COVID-19

Friday, July 29th 2022 10:00am 3 min read
Dr. Jessica Peatross dr.jess.md @drjessmd

Hospitalist & top functional MD who gets to the root cause. Stealth infection & environmental toxicity keynote speaker.

While the debate about ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine rage on, doctors are beginning to discover the benefits of methylene blue for treating COVID-19.

Research shows that the oxygen carrying capacity of red blood cells increases when a patient receives a methylene blue treatment. In addition, a recent study shows that methylene blue acts as a low-micromolar inhibitor of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and ACE2 interaction.

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), causes the continuing outbreaks of COVID-19. Worldwide, healthcare systems and entire economies have been greatly impacted. While COVID-19 vaccines have been introduced at lightning speed, the virus has gone through multiple genomic variations resulting in new strains. The data on the vaccines and adverse reactions are generating questions into their efficacy, which is a key reason that researchers and doctors continue to seek new therapeutics in the fight against COVID-19.

Oral antivirals to treat COVID-19

Many scientists suggest that COVID-19 may need an orally bioavailable antiviral for effective treatment. Thus, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given emergency use authorization to 2 new drugs, nirmatrelvir (suppresses virus reproduction) and molnupiravir (inhibits protease activity). In addition, scientists have investigated small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) as a potential treatment for COVID-19.

With this in mind, researchers are looking at potential inhibitors of the PPIs between the spike protein and cell surface receptors. Such an inhibitor could prevent the cell attachment and entry of the virus into the cell. However, finding an SMI for this task has been challenging, although researchers have made progress. The FDA has given approval for clinical use to 3 SMIs: fostemsavir, lifitegrast, and venetoclax.

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